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Local Content and Services Report

2019- WNCW's license holder is Isothermal Community College and the station functions as a department of the college.  WNCW furthers the educational mission of the college as a full service public radio station that provides news, information, and music programming to the region served by our signal.  Our region is made up of a diverse and varied culture.  WNCW strives to provide programming and support that will stimulate innovation, economic development, lifelong learning, the arts, and the musical and cultural heritage that is so revered in Western NC and the region covered by our large broadcast coverage area.  We make a concerted effort to identify issues of concern and importance to our audience and engage with partners in the region to provide our support and produce programming that addresses those areas of concern.  WNCW provides our audience with news from the local, regional, and national level.  We include longer form feature stories on important issues and provide multiple in depth interviews each week that deal with important issues to our region.  We produce much of this programming in house, especially on matters at the local and regional level, and include nationally syndicated programming like Morning Edition, NPR News each hour, 51%, Making Contact, and other syndicated programming that provides education and knowledge on important issues to our audience.  Much of our news and information programming produced in house serves to highlight the work and efforts of the many various local, state, and national agencies, non-profits, community groups, arts organizations, health agencies, environmental groups, and educational institutions, and the many other entities that we work with, across our region.  All these entities share the common goal of improving the lives of area residents.  We also air several short form, locally produced, educational pieces on a weekly basis.  Programs like "History Dibs and Dabs", produced in Association with the Old Fort Historical Society, "The Southern Appalachian Creature Feature", produced in association with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, "Down the Road on the Blue Ridge Music Trails", produced in association with the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area, and many others.  Our signal covers Western North Carolina and beyond, reaching portions of five states.  Our broadcast range covers an area that has a rich and very diverse musical culture.  We strive to preserve and highlight that musical culture that is so beloved by our region.  A day of the musical programming on WNCW will include old time, bluegrass, classic country, blues, soul, folk, americana, jazz, and many more genres.  Allo these genres have roots that can be traced back tot he mountains of NC, to SC, to TN, and GA.  All of these area areas that we reach with our broadcast signal, so we strive to highlight and preserve this musical history.  Our night and weekend programming features several shows of block programming regarding several of the genres so prevalent in our area:  Goin' Across the Mountain - featuring all traditional bluegrass music,  The Saturday Night House Party - highlighting the blues music that originated in upstate SC, The Gospel Truth - focusing on the Bluegrass Gospel and Southern Gospel music rooted in our region, Local Color - shining a light on the local and regional artists that make up the region's thriving local music scene, and many others.  As a part of Isothermal Community College, we also value the importance of sharing the knowledge of our industry.  We work in conjunction with the college's Broadcasting and Production Technology curriculum to offer students the opportunity for real life experience.  Students produce programming for our "ARC Overnight" program that airs on WNCW each week.  In the last year, we have also started a program with the BPT curriculum that gives students the opportunity to shoot video of our live music sessions with artists from our Studio B each week.  Students run camera, direct, produce, and edit the videos of these sessions which air live on our social media platforms and are then edited and loaded to our website, or WNCW- Studio B YouTube Channel.  We also offer internships that provide students real work experience in the various departments of the radio station.  Interns spend time in the programming, business, and membership departments of WNCW, gaining "hands on" experience that prepares them for a career in broadcasting.  BPT Students leave the program with invaluable "real world" experience to include on their resumes and videos and recordings for their portfolios to highlight their skills.  We truly value and respect the "public service" portion of our mission as public broadcasters and strive to honor that mission.  Our efforts have made WNCW a highly respected public radio station, on the local, regional, and national level. 

WNCW works with several local, regional, and national organizations that share common goals when it comes to several key initiatives that we support.  Those initiatives are 1- Educating our audience on identified issues and concerns of importance to the region, 2 – Supporting revitalization and conservation in the region, and 3 – Preserving and highlighting the musical heritage of our region.

Organizations partnered with for education on issues and concerns of importance include:  The Rutherford County Humane Society, Asheville Area Habitat for Humanity, The Asheville Citizen Times, The Greenville News, The Charlotte Observer, The Red Cross, Relay for Life, Rutherford Housing Authority, Isothermal Community College, UNC Asheville, NC State university, Western Carolina University, Wilkes Community College, Rutherford Regional Hospital, The American Heart Association, Pardee Hospital, Rutherford County Schools, Rutherford County Health Department, Rutherford County Women Roofers, Rutherford County Sheriffs Department, and the NC Highway Patrol.

Organizations partnered with on revitalization and conservation efforts include:  Riverlink, Chimney Rock State Park, NC Co-Operative Extension, Town of Hendersonville, NC, City of Greenville, SC, Town of Saluda, Destination Cleveland County, The Blueridge Parkway Foundation, Hagood Mill Historic Site, McDowell County Tourism Authority, Asheville Downtown Association, Rutherford County Tourism Authority, US Fish and Wildlife Services, Cleveland County Historical Society, Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy, and The Foothills Conservancy of NC.

Organizations partnered with on preservation of musical heritage include:  The Foundation Performing Arts Center, Young Appalachian Musicians, Lake Eden Arts Festival, Merlefest, The Don Gibson Theatre, The Blue Ridge Music Trail, The Blumenthal Performing Arts Center, The Peace Center, The Folk Heritage Committee, Dianna Wortham Theatre, The Earl Scruggs Center, The Tryon Fine Arts Center, and the Earl Scruggs Music Festival.

This can be measured in a multitude of ways.  Perhaps one of the biggest is the increased financial support that we have seen from our members.  WNCW had the largest Fund Drive, in terms of dollars raised, that I have seen in my 14 years here in the Fall of 2019.  It makes it obvious that we are on the right track.  Our audience values what we do. They recognize that we are truly working to help spread the word for agencies, non-profits, and organizations that deal with issues and concerns of importance to them.  They recognize that we share the same values.  We can also see the results of our efforts in the large number of our members that show up at various charity events, volunteer projects, benefit concerts, and music and arts festivals, involving partner organizations.  We have a station presence on site for many of these events and see many of our members in attendance.  It's also visible in the willingness of our large group of volunteers who give of their time to help with our pledge drives, come in and work in our office, help man our booths at various concerts, festivals, and charity events, and show up to build houses for Habitat for Humanity, when we partner with them to have a WNCW build day.  It's apparent in the huge number of businesses from across the region that continue to underwrite our programming year after year, and the new ones that come on board each year.  I can see it directly myself in the correspondence I receive from listeners and various partners that we work with.  Comments like these:

To all WNCW Staff, past, present and future,

Congratulations and Happy Birthday!  I’m sure we will be donating during the fundraiser.  Ya’ll have done a great job over the years.  My car radio is permanently tuned to WNCW and you are our wake-up alarm on the clock radio every morning.  Our son, who currently lives in the Chicago area, comes to visit I’m sure so he can get his dose of WNCW.  When others come to the area to visit, they always ask, “What station is this?  I’ve never heard music like this before."  We love you guys!  Here’s to many more years of success,

Donna G in Taylors, SC

I stream at work, and was so happy to hear the phenomenal playlist this morning!!  Thank you so very much.  Y'all are the very best "station in the nation"!  Possibly in the world.  I listen mostly during day from 7:30a-6p, and sure appreciate all your music hosts!!  Even the ones after hours (for me) and on weekends...Y'all do a fantastic job!!

Gratefully - Joan Oriol

Happy Monday ya’ll!  Just wanted to quickly say how grateful we are for Holidaze for Habitat! That was a great night – but honestly to me the greatest part was our community rallying around our work. I don’t have the words to adequately explain how thankful I am.  Hope it is a good day, and please let us know if there is anything we can do for you. I’ve attached a photo I took Friday night, and I feel certain that Ariane has a great collection to share as well.  Take care!

Beth Russo

Development Officer, Individual and Corporate Giving

Asheville Area Habitat for Humanity

WNCW provides our Broadcasting and Production Technology students with an excellent opportunity for learning and knowledge.  They get to see what it's like to work in a professional radio station.  The students learn how to produce and record professional programming that will air on WNCW.  During Radio Performance courses students learn to follow the format and record hours of programming to air on WNCW.  Students also have the opportunity to intern with WNCW.  During the internship students get “hands on” experience in all facets of station operations and college credit is awarded for successful completion of the internship.  We just recently started having students shoot video for WNCW’s Studio B sessions.  The video is put on the internet live on WNCW’s Facebook Page.  It is also recorded for editing later to be placed on WNCW’s Studio B Youtube Page.  The students get to work a multiple camera shoot and learn what it’s like to be in a live situation.  It’s also "real world' experience as they prepare to enter the workforce.  Our students benefit just from having the station in the same building.  They see how things work on a daily basis and many of them become involved with the station volunteering for the station fund drive, or in other areas where their help is needed.  WNCW is a tremendous asset to our students - Jim Liverett,  Broadcasting and Production Technology Instructor, Isothermal Community College.

WNCW actively works to identify and address the needs of the minority community.  We are able to address issues of importance through various forms of locally produced programming.  That programming consists of local and national news stories, long form programming, and feature interviews on such topics.

Recent interviews and shows featured the following:

A program highlighting the Minority Male Mentoring Program, which focused on their efforts to identify and recruit at risk minority male students for assistance and mentoring.  It provided interviews and information about the program, how to become a mentee and how one might become involved as a mentor.

Other features included a story and interview with Arianna Kjellquist  of Asheville Area Habitat for Humanity and their efforts to provide proper housing for low income families.  The program featured info on who qualifies and how to apply to receive aid, but also how to become involved with the organization as a volunteer to help with the building of a Habitat Home.  The interview also highlighted the fact that this year’s Warren Haynes Christmas Jam, a benefit concert that has been a major fundraiser for Asheville Area Habitat, has been canceled for this year.  They also discussed a benefit concert that WNCW and The Orange Peel organized and carried out, in the absence of the Christmas jam, with all the proceeds going to Asheville Area Habitat for Humanity.

Another recent interview featured, Jeffrey Blount, an author and veteran director of NBC news programs ranging from “Meet the Press” to “The Today Show.  Mr. Blount spoke at Isothermal Community College to kick off Black History Month. Blount is an accomplished public speaker, and discussed the issues of race, social justice and writing.    

WNCW also airs nationally syndicated programming like Morning Edition, 51 Percent, Making Contact, and many others that regularly address minority issues.  For 2020, we plan to increase our programming in all areas of concern, but especially issues that relate to the minority community.  We increased  the amount of programming concerning issues of importance to our audience and will continue that process into 2020 with an even greater focus on minority issues.

In all honesty, WNCW likely wouldn't even be on the air without our CPB funding.  We would be hard pressed to provide much of the programming that we do without the financial support provided by our CPB grant.  The funding allows us to provide our audience with quality nationally syndicated programming and locally produced programming. Without our grant funding, we likely couldn't afford programs like Morning Edition, and other nationally syndicated programming, at all.  It allows us to have a small full-time staff of professional broadcasters, people who are well trained, and know how to produce quality programming for our audience.  Programming that addresses the issues and concerns that are most important to our listeners.  Concerns at a national, regional, and local level.  Without that funding, our full-time staff would likely be much smaller and our ability to accomplish our mission much harder..  It has allowed us to make use of the revenue from our fund drives and underwriting support on desperately needed equipment upgrades, like the recently purchased new main antenna.  It replaced the original one that had been in use since the station went on the air 30 years ago.  It had been patched back together more times than I can count, and was way beyond it's life expectancy. That project alone was just over $100,000 dollars, so one can understand how without our CPB funding, a small station like WNCW, couldn't remain on the air.  The funding allows us to purchase new broadcast gear, like the small consoles in our production rooms, which enables us to improve the quality of the programing produced in house for our audience.  We are truly grateful for the funding we receive through the CPB.  There is no doubt that without it, we simply could not remain on the air, and our ability to educate, inform, and entertain the people of Western North Carolina, would be far less effective.  It is my hope that Congress will see the value in the services that WNCW and all public broadcasters provide for our citizens, and will continue to adequately fund the CPB.  WNCW believes in our mission to help educate and inform our audience and serve our community here in Western NC and the surrounding region.  Stations like WNCW provide a voice for opinions and information that might not otherwise be heard, were it not for public broadcasters.  Our funding from the CPB insures that we are able to continue that mission, year after year.