roots

Live Friday, May 17th between 1 & 2pm: Jamie McLean

May 10, 2019

When not working with Aaron Neville, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, and others as their lead guitarist, Jamie McLean is busy churning out his own songs and recordings of New Orleans soul, Delta blues, middle America roots and New York City swagger. He plays Knoxville on Thursday, Asheville on Friday, and Charlotte on Saturday!

Album cover with artist playing guitar
Reed Foehl

Hello and welcome to WNCW’s new music podcast, On The Way Up, I’m your host Joe Kendrick for episode 40 of the show. Get set for some of the best new music to be featured here on grassroots radio, from acoustic to electric, from our daytime mix to ARC Overnight, and a whole lot in between.

Band members smiling and posing for photographer in studio
Vicki Dameron

The Steep Canyon Rangers performed live on our airwaves this past January, just as they were re-emerging from a well-deserved rest following a busy and successful year of touring on their own, as well as with Steve Martin.

'Gospel Roots of Rock and Soul', hosted by Cece Winans, will air on WNCW-FM 88.7 every Tuesday night in February between 8-9pm.  It is a four-part documentary series illustrating the influence of Black Gospel on early rock and soul music. The hour examines the history and foundation of Black gospel from spirituals and how those songs informed the gospel music of the great gospel quartets including The Dixie Hummingbirds, The Pilgrim Travelers, The Golden Gates, The Caravans, and The Soul Stirrers featuring Sam Cooke.

Molly Kummerle
Ben Mason Photography

In this episode, a bluegrass legend meets an up and coming regional act, a punk rocker of days gone by finally gets his solo debut, roots music stars mingle with Americana expatriates, and DJ For A Day returns, this time talking with Molly Kummerle of the band Paper Tiger about being a DJ -- not on the radio, but at a party, a “Molly Parti” to be exact. There’s also the Segue of The Week, which matches a lady Australian rocker with a post-punk classic.

Playlist:

The roots of the banjo trace directly to West Africa. White Southerners learned to play early gourd banjos, probably built from the African slaves’ memories. The banjo was popularized in the 19th century by minstrel shows.  Though it seemed close to disappearing in the late 20th century, the African-American banjo tradition has enjoyed a renaissance in recent years, led by such young artists as Rhiannon Giddens, Dom Flemons, Jerron Paxton, and Amythyst Kiah.