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The Way We See the World: Exploring Indigenous Representation in Film

ᎤᏕᏲᏅ_(What_They’ve_Been_Taught)_still1_preferred.jpeg

The Way We See the World: Exploring Indigenous Representation in Film

the Museum of the Cherokee Indian’s upcoming event The Way We See the World: Exploring Indigenous Representation in Film, an evening of screenings and conversations among leading Native filmmakers and storytellers. On July 22 at the Mountainside Theatre (home of Unto These Hills) in Cherokee, North Carolina, the Museum will welcome special guests Sterlin Harjo (Seminole Nation, executive producer/showrunner of the Golden Globe-nominated FX series Reservation Dogs), Brit Hensel (Cherokee Nation, director of the Sundance-selected short “ᎤᏕᏲᏅ [What They’ve Been Taught]”), Keli Gonzales (Cherokee Nation, associate producer of “ᎤᏕᏲᏅ [What They’ve Been Taught]”), Anthony Sneed (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, writer/director/producer of the short films “SWIPE” and “STRIPPER”), and Peshawn Bread (Comanche Nation, writer/director, “The Daily Life of Mistress Red”).

The evening features screenings of six acclaimed documentary and narrative short films from Native writers, directors, and producers who, through their own unique lenses, dismantle Hollywood stereotypes and capture a range of Indigenous experiences with heart, humor, and provocation. An art market, silent auction, and special VIP reception complete the schedule of events.

The event’s special guests, who will speak about their experiences and Native representation in the industry during a panel discussion, are already leaving their marks on history. Every writer, director, and series regular on Sterlin Harjo’s Peabody Award-winning Reservation Dogs is Indigenous. Brit Hensel is the first woman who is a citizen of Cherokee Nation to direct an official selection at Sundance Film Festival. To tell the coming-of-age stories “SWIPE” and “STRIPPER,” Anthony Sneed cast young citizens of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, coaching them in the acting and filmmaking process.
All proceeds from the evening will directly support the Museum’s Community Learning and Educational Programming initiatives, in-person and virtual opportunities that empower enrolled members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to deepen their connection to culture. From pottery making to beadwork to traditional babywearing, these workshops, lectures, and classes are offered free of charge.

To learn more, visit mci.org.

Mountainside Theatre
$35-50
05:00 PM - 10:30 PM on Fri, 22 Jul 2022

Event Supported By

Museum of the Cherokee Indian
(828) 497-3481
communications@mci.org

Mountainside Theatre

688 Drama Rd.
Cherokee, North Carolina 28719
(828) 497-3481
communications@mci.org