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How young people are taking action against climate change

How do you tell your kid that the planet is ending?
Ashanti Fortson for NPR

This comic, illustrated by Ashanti Fortson, is inspired by an interview with climate activist Xiye Bastida from TED Radio Hour's episode Climate Mindset.

I was at the beach for the first time in seven months. My kids are never going to go to the beach.
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That's the question I get from parents. As if I have an answer. I would never want to do that to a kid. Your childhood ends when you find out because so much hope is placed on you.
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When I was younger, my family and I would go into the highlands of central Mexico and have lunch by the lake. And so the prayer of thanks would begin. That's how I grew up.
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I remember driving by El Rio Lerma with my dad. It's the most polluted river in Mexico and it's right by my hometown.
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One generation. How does that happen? Will things be better for the next generation?
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This is the chance that we have. Intergenerational cooperation. We want to work with you.
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We cannot waste our time blaming each other. We have to come together.
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I love the saying that goes: We don't inherit the earth, we borrow it from our children. I'm going to work to save the planet for my children.
/ Ashanti Fortson for NPR
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Ashanti Fortson for NPR

About Xiye Bastida

Xiye Bastida is a climate justice activist based in New York City, and one of the lead organizers of the Fridays For Future youth climate strike movement. She sits on the administration committee of the Peoples Climate Movement, where she brings the voice of youth to existing grassroots and climate organizations. She is also a coordinator for the Re-Earth Initiative.

In 2018, she was invited to the 9th United Nations World Urban Forum to speak about indigenous cosmology. She received the "Spirit of the UN" award in 2018. For the March 2019 climate strike, she mobilized 600 students from her school. Since then she has taken a citywide leadership role in organizing climate strikes and speaking out about climate justice issues in rallies and town halls. Bastida has also launched a youth activism training program to expand the climate justice movement and is a member of Sunrise Movement and Extinction Rebellion.

Bastida was born and raised in Mexico as part of the Otomi-Toltec indigenous peoples.

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